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Subject Test World History

Question 6 of 22

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SAT Subject Test

Differences between which two religions contributed to violent conflicts in India during and after the struggle for independence in 1947?

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Hinduism and Buddhism

Correct Answer: 
No

Islam and Christianity

Correct Answer: 
No

Hinduism and Islam

Correct Answer: 
Yes

Islam and Buddhism

Correct Answer: 
No

Hinduism and Jainism

Correct Answer: 
No

By the end of the Second World War, British India had a large Muslim minority (in addition to the Hindu majority and smaller Sikh, Buddhist and Zoroastrian minorities), representing between a quarter and third of the population.  The Muslim population was largest in the wide band of territory across northern India, and Muslims were the majority in the important provinces of Punjab, Sindh and East Bengal. Although the Indian National Congress of Mohandas Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru strongly opposed sectarian divisions within the independence movement, many Indian Muslims felt that Indian National Congress was dominated by Hindu political interests and that, should India remain unified after the British withdrawal, it would inevitably become a Hindu state. As a result of these fears, the Muslim League of Muhammad Ali Jinnah began supporting the “Two Nation Theory” and the idea of creating a separate state of Pakistan. During the hastily conceived and executed British withdrawal from India in 1947, the two-state solution became a reality and the former British India was partitioned into a Hindu-majority India and a Muslim- majority Pakistan (which at the time included both present-day Pakistan and present-day Bangladesh). The partition was accompanied by widespread violence and population displacement, and unresolved issues from the partition have continued to plague Indo-Pakistani relations since 1947, especially regarding the status of Kashmir.

Question Difficulty: 
easy