Concordance

beginning of content:

We’re providing concordance tools to help college admission officers and others compare scores on the redesigned SAT with those on the old SAT, given before March 2016. Because the two tests are different, their scores are not equivalent — concordance is the only way to make comparisons between them.

We’re also working closely with the NCAA, the NAIA, the Common Data Set Initiative, and the U.S. Department of Education on their use of concordance tables.

Concordance Tools and Tables

Concordance Tools

Designed especially for students and counselors, the SAT Score Converter online tool and mobile app concord scores for individual students.

The large-scale SAT concordance tools allow institutions to concord a large number of scores quickly. They are both MS Excel spreadsheets and contain detailed instructions on the first tab of the document:

Concordance Tables and Guide

Using Concordance Tables

Concordance tables support these essential campus uses:

  • Comparing scores on the redesigned SAT to the old SAT and the ACT for admission and placement purposes
  • Determining a policy score on the redesigned SAT that is comparable to an established policy score
  • Converting scores for use in a predictive model or index
  • Converting scores for use in internal and external reports

Concordance Tips

  • Use concordance tables consistently to ensure equity in the admission process.
  • You may find that concorded total scores do not equal the sum of concorded section scores; this is common and expected.
  • Since most students in the high school class of 2016 submitted old SAT scores, most colleges will convert new SAT scores to old SAT scores for this cohort.
  • Since most students in the high school class of 2017 will submit new SAT scores, most colleges will convert old SAT scores to new SAT scores for this cohort.
  • Both 2400 total and 1600 total concordance tables are provided since some colleges consider all three sections of the old SAT while others consider only two (Critical Reading and Mathematics).
  • Because the new SAT tests both reading and writing in one section, there’s no concordance table from the new SAT’s Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (ERW) section to the old SAT’s Critical Reading section. Instead, compare these sections by concording a combination of the old SAT’s Writing section and Critical Reading section to the new SAT’s ERW section.

Concordance Tables

Higher education professionals need concordance tables at the total, section, and test levels. To ensure the highest degree of accuracy, we’re providing two tables for each concorded score pair, allowing institutions to convert scores in both directions.

Concordance Tables: New SAT to Old SAT and ACT
Table 1 New SAT to Old SAT (Total 2400)
Table 2 New SAT to Old SAT (Total 1600)
Table 3 New SAT Math Section to Old SAT Math Section
Table 4 New SAT Writing and Language Test to Old SAT Writing Section
Table 5 New SAT Reading Test to Old SAT Critical Reading Section
Table 6 New SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Section to Old SAT Writing plus Critical Reading Sections
Table 7 New SAT Total to ACT Composite
Table 8 New SAT Writing and Language to ACT English/Writing (pre-2015)
Concordance Tables:Old SAT and ACT to New SAT
Table 9 Old SAT to New SAT (Total 2400)
Table 10 Old SAT to New SAT (Total 1600)
Table 11 Old SAT Writing plus Critical Reading Sections to New SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Section
Table 12 Old SAT Math Section to New SAT Math Section to New SAT Math Test
Table 13 Old SAT Writing Section to new SAT Writing and Language Test
Table 14 Old SAT Critical Reading Section to New SAT Reading Test
Table 15 ACT Composite to new SAT Total
Table 16 ACT English/Writing (pre-2015) to new SAT Writing and Language

Developing Concordance Tables

We’re using the Equipercentile Concordance method, which relates scores on each test that have the same percentile rank. In other words, scores on two different tests are considered concorded when they have the same percentile rank. For example, the score at the 75th percentile on the old SAT score distribution would correspond to the score at the 75th percentile of the redesigned SAT score distribution.